eMentoring videos showcase STEM impact for regional students

By | News

In2science is proud to share two new inside views of our online eMentoring program for regional schools. The program offers a valuable opportunity for students to connect with volunteer university students, who help guide and inspire them along their STEM pathway.

In the first eMentoring case study video (above), we hear about the implementation and success of the program at Catholic College Wodonga (CCW) and how such programs help to remove the distance barrier for young people in regional Victoria. CCW signed up as an In2science partner school in late 2017, to provide opportunities for their science students to extend their learning and expand their career awareness.

Read More

STEM on the agenda

By | News

August was a busy month for STEM education in Victoria, with a series of exciting initiatives taking place during National Science Week and beyond. From policy discussions to regional STEM expos and award ceremonies, In2science was there and brings you some highlights! Read More

Preparing students for STEM careers: how can Industry help?

By | Events, News

On Thursday 13 September 2018, In2science will host a free forum on industry-school partnerships in STEM education. We invite you to join us to hear from leaders in industry, education and government, and to share your ideas and experiences.

In this article, we explore the emergence of such partnerships as a priority in STEM education policy and the benefits that they can provide to schools, students and industry alike. Read More

Meet a Mentor: Alicia Stevens

By | Profiles

In2science mentor Ali Stevens

What are you studying, and why do you like it? I am currently in my third year of a Bachelor of Health Science at Swinburne University of Technology, majoring in psychology and psychophysiology. I love psychology as it has taught me the skills to be able to help and understand others. I find psychophysiology so fascinating as the brain is such a complex system and its capacities continue to astound me!

Tell us about your In2science placement! I am currently mentoring at St. Joseph’s College Ferntree Gully. I was a bit apprehensive at the start as it’s an all-boys year 8 science class, but I liked the idea of a challenge! The boys can be very energetic at times, but it’s really fun to take that energy and get them engaged in what they are learning and relate it to things that they haven’t thought of before!

Why did you become an In2science mentor? I struggled with science at school and never thought I was capable of studying it at university so avoided it altogether during VCE. I really wish I could have had someone tell me back then that I was more than capable and that you shouldn’t let others limit your potential. I want to be that voice of encouragement for students: If I can do science, anyone can!

What’s the best thing about In2science? I had a student who was quite shy, in the sense that he enjoyed science but kept it quiet because all his friends thought it was uncool. He told me that he wanted to have a career in sport instead, as that’s what all his friends wanted to do. I was able to have a lovely chat with him telling him about careers in sport science and sport psychology, both disciplines he had never heard of before. It was lovely to see him become so excited about science and the possibility of what studying STEM could do for him.

I really wish I could have had someone tell me back then that I was more than capable… I want to be that voice of encouragement for students.

What message do you hope to pass onto the students in your In2science class? Don’t give up on something because you don’t find it easy to start with! If you find the subject matter interesting keep at it and it will become easier with time.

What inspired you to study what you are currently studying? I grew up in England and I know it’s going to sound silly, but I saw a stage show performed by Derren Brown who does tricks based on psychology and I found it amazing! After that, I read as many books about the mind as I could and just knew that’s what I wanted to do with my career.

What do you want to do after you finish university and why? I haven’t fully decided yet, but I know that after my undergraduate degree I want to continue my studies! I love educational psychology, so I want to do either a masters degree or a PhD in that field. I really want to help children to have the best experience and support during their school years as it can be such a tough and challenging time for them.

If you could have an hour to chat with any scientist/mathematician, who would it be and why? Erik Erikson! He was a developmental psychologist who studied humans at all stages of their life. I would love to have been able to chat with him about his findings and how they changed the way we view lifespan development today.

What advice would you give other students looking to get involved in In2science? Definitely do it! Yes, it can be challenging, but it is so rewarding. Being able to give students a more personal perspective on studying STEM is invaluable knowledge to pass on. I’ve talked to students who say they don’t like science; yet when they have an open discussion about science with someone who can give them one-on-one attention, they’ve realised that science isn’t limited to what we learn at school, it can take you in any direction in life you wish to go!

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!

STEM skills for all careers

By | News

“There are no limits on what a STEM graduate can do, and we shouldn’t impose them.”

– Dr Alan Finkel AO, Australia’s Chief Scientist and In2science Patron

In the lead-up to the In2science STEM Career Speed Networking event, we reflect on the need for STEM skills for all careers.

Australia’s STEM workforce is growing, and studies show that STEM skills are relevant to an increasingly wide range of occupations. Graduates from degrees in science, engineering and mathematics are contributing to an innovative Australian economy in many different ways.

For current STEM university students, an ocean of opportunity awaits beyond graduation. Graduates from STEM degrees go on to be business owners, science communicators, engineers, consultants, educators, policy advisors and much more. Encouraging the emerging STEM workforce to seek out diverse occupations is one reason why the biological, physical and mathematical sciences directly underpin 14% of Australia’s economy. “No clever country would encourage its most STEM-literate people to pursue only traditional research paths, in universities or public sector research agencies”, says Dr Finkel.

Early-career jobs that included ‘problem solving’ in the job description attracted salaries with an extra $7,745 compared to other early-career jobs.”Foundation for Young Australians

Future workplaces will rely more on problem solving, independent learning, analytical thinking and communication skills than ever before. Today’s STEM graduates will use their technical knowledge in combination with ‘enterprise’ skills, skills that foster innovation and collaboration.

In2science is committed to supporting the next generation of innovative STEM workers. Current university students are already developing their communication and teamwork skills through In2science mentoring. Working with high school science and maths students across Melbourne, In2science mentors think creatively, collaborate with teachers and adapt to new situations every time they step into the classroom.

In 2018, In2science is also facilitating networking between In2science mentors and professionals working in a range of STEM-related workplaces. At the In2science Career Speed Networking event on 17th May, mentors will have the chance to talk with recent STEM graduates, In2science alumni and experienced industry professionals about career pathways, job applications and how to develop crucial enterprise skills that many employers now require.

The Speed Career Networking event is another way In2science mentors are gaining valuable employability skills while still at University. Our thanks go to the Selby Scientific Foundation for renewing their support for our mentor development program.

Current and past In2science mentors and other University students can register for the Speed Career Networking event here.

Meet a Mentor: Daniel Putra de Jesus

By | Profiles

In2science mentor Daniel Putra de Jesus

What are you studying, and why do you like it? I’m in my second year of the Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology at RMIT University, majoring in Civil Engineering. I chose to study civil engineering because I’m fascinated by how engineers use maths and physics to design and build structures. Civil engineering is a broad field of study which allows me to explore different parts of it, from super-structure designs above the earth to foundations and footing designs beneath the earth. The study of soil and fluid mechanics are mind-blowing! I love fluid mechanics because fluid behaves in such a unique way under pressure. My lab sessions enhance my understanding of how theories apply in real-world situations.

Tell us about your In2science placement! This semester is my first placement as an In2science mentor at Simonds Catholic College in West Melbourne. It’s an all-boys school and I’m very fortunate to work with an incredible group of year 8 students. Most of my mentoring sessions are lab sessions. For instance, in my first week of mentoring the students did a lab prac on how matter changes due to chemical reactions. Lab sessions are the best way for me to get to know the students and vice versa. I was able to help them with the practical component and questions for their lab reports.

Why did you become an In2science mentor? When I was in middle school, I enjoyed science and maths, but I didn’t have someone who I could talk to or ask questions about STEM. More recently I have found that there are huge benefits when you work through problems and issues with friends, or with someone close in age. This is what inspired me to be an In2science mentor.

What’s the best thing about In2science? The best thing about In2science is I get to interact with students who all have very different plans for their future. This program allows me to share my experience, give advice and influence their decisions. Working with teachers and students in a class environment is really challenging, and I find myself out of my comfort zone, but it’s ultimately rewarding. With In2science pre-placement training I have been able to tackle some of the difficulties I encounter during my placement.

By being in the class and spending some time talking about the student’s interests, I hope they come to realise that STEM influences every aspect of life.

What message do you hope to pass onto the students in your In2science class? I want to make students realise maths and science are fun just like other subjects, and most importantly everyone can be outstanding in a STEM field. People say maths and science are boring unless you’re a nerd, which is a myth. By being in the class and spending some time talking about the student’s interests, I hope they come to realise that STEM influences every aspect of life and that pursuing a career in STEM field is achievable.

What inspired you to study what you are currently studying? I chose to study civil engineering because I want to contribute as much as I can to the development of my homeland, Timor-Leste. I grew up in Timor-Leste, where we did not have the luxuries that first world countries have in term of infrastructure. Learning about the lack of infrastructure, clean water and sanitation in Timor-Leste inspired me to study to become a civil engineer. Since I have a passion for maths and physics, becoming a civil engineer will be the best way to help my community and ultimately my country.

What do you want to do after you finish university and why? After completing my current program, I would like to continue to study a Bachelor of Engineering (Civil and Infrastructure) and major in water engineering. After completing my degree, I will go back to Timor-Leste to help my country and apply what I learn here to benefit people in Timor-Leste.

If you could have an hour to chat with any scientist/mathematician, who would it be and why? It would be an honour for me to spend an hour with the great Sir Isaac Newton. His contribution to maths and science is priceless. The application of Newton’s three fundamental laws in our daily lives is enormous. His contribution to calculus makes us realise that there is another approach to solving maths problems besides algebra. Above all, he taught me to ask “Why?”.

What advice would you give other students looking to get involved in In2science? Why wait? Get into it! Being in the class means a lot to the students. They look up to you as their role model. Believe it or not, you do influence the students’ views on STEM. Students appreciate the time you spend with them. They get to ask you questions that might not have been asked before. If you think you can’t change someone else’s decisions when they grow up, then think again!

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!