Meet a Mentor: Lachlan McPhee

By | Profiles

In2science mentor Lachie McPhee

What are you studying, and why do you like it? I am in my second year of uni studying a Bachelor of Biomedical Science at La Trobe University. I like the course because of its flexibility in terms of the subjects I want to learn. My core subjects are a maximum of two biochemistry subjects per semester and then I have free reign. I am doing a human anatomy and physiology major and love every minute of it. The way that all the subjects come together shows how deeply involved every structure of the body is. It really allows me to open up to a broader range of thinking when it comes down to something that can normally be so basic.

Tell us about your In2science placement! At first it was really daunting. I was placed in a biology class but had not done biology since first year. I walked into the first class and they were finishing their topic on plant biology – which was really lucky for me. Then I found out that the next topic was human biology, especially looking at the cardiovascular system. It was almost a real coincidence that this happened because I felt that I could now make a serious impact on the students when it comes to their learning. Every week they touch on a new topic and I am able to guide their thinking about a particular topic.

During the middle and end parts of the program I almost stepped into the teacher’s role in a way that I was able to lead a class discussion, teach them a new topic, or help them with their work if they ever needed it.

Why did you become an In2science mentor? A close friend actually recommended that I give the program a go. He knew I had a busy schedule but said that I would fit directly into the program because he saw how well I can interact with students. At first I was unsure about whether the it would be the right program for me, but I signed up knowing that this would be a great experience and would allow me to help influence the next generation of young thinkers.

What’s the best thing about In2science? Definitely the students. Every week the relationships that I build become stronger and stronger with the students. They look forward to me coming in, and I look forward to seeing them every week. Sometimes we don’t even talk about school – they talk to me about their everyday lives which is the best thing about it. I become less like a teacher, and more like a mentor in that regard.

You force yourself to think in many different ways to explain things to students, and importantly, you learn a lot about yourself.

What message do you hope to pass onto the students in your In2science class? Don’t disregard science, even in the most basic form. The logical thinking and processes of inquiry that are applied in class apply everywhere in life. If there’s only one thing to take out of your classes, it should be the ability to think, to learn and, in some cases, to relearn.

What do you want to do after you finish university and why? I would like to work in the sporting area, particularly with regards to concussion. I would like to go to medical school and learn how to treat and manage patients that suffer from concussions. Another option is working in research as a neurophysiologist with a specialisation in concussion – this way I may even be able to continue teaching but at a tertiary level.

If you could have an hour to chat with any scientist/mathematician, who would it be and why? James Watson and Francis Crick. They were the ones to discover that our DNA is in a double helix and encodes everything that makes us unique. How they did that during their time is incredible.

What advice would you give other students looking to get involved in In2science? Even if you’re not sure about it – do it! You’re not just a mentor for the kids in this role, you challenge yourself to think further. You force yourself to think in many different ways to explain things to students, and importantly, you learn a lot about yourself.

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!