eMentoring videos showcase STEM impact for regional students

By | News

In2science is proud to share two new inside views of our online eMentoring program for regional schools. The program offers a valuable opportunity for students to connect with volunteer university students, who help guide and inspire them along their STEM pathway.

In the first eMentoring case study video (above), we hear about the implementation and success of the program at Catholic College Wodonga (CCW) and how such programs help to remove the distance barrier for young people in regional Victoria. CCW signed up as an In2science partner school in late 2017, to provide opportunities for their science students to extend their learning and expand their career awareness.

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STEM on the agenda

By | News

August was a busy month for STEM education in Victoria, with a series of exciting initiatives taking place during National Science Week and beyond. From policy discussions to regional STEM expos and award ceremonies, In2science was there and brings you some highlights! Read More

Preparing students for STEM careers: how can Industry help?

By | Events, News

On Thursday 13 September 2018, In2science will host a free forum on industry-school partnerships in STEM education. We invite you to join us to hear from leaders in industry, education and government, and to share your ideas and experiences.

In this article, we explore the emergence of such partnerships as a priority in STEM education policy and the benefits that they can provide to schools, students and industry alike. Read More

In2science forges new partnerships with regional schools

By | News

In2science eMentoring Coordinator, Robyn Gamble, presents Notre Dame College students and Principal, Lew Nagle with their Partner School Certficate

More Victorian secondary school students from regional and rural backgrounds are reaping the benefits of connecting with university student eMentors as In2science expands its reach and forges new partnerships with regional schools. Through weekly online interactions, students who would otherwise be disadvantaged by geographical isolation or limited access to resources, discover their love of science and maths.

The Victorian Department of Education and Training recently featured the transformative experience of In2science eMentees from regional partner school Maffra Secondary College in its Stories from the Education State series. “Student mentoring takes education to the next level” emphasised how programs like In2science utilise funding from the Department to ensure that Victoria remains the Education State. Maffra SC student, Charlotte was effusive in her praise for the program, “The In2science program has been an amazing help for me in and outside of school, and I would encourage anyone who loves STEM to try it and see what it can offer.”

Robyn Gamble, In2science eMentoring Coordinator, recently had the pleasure of meeting with staff and students at some of our new regional partner schools. In a jam-packed itinerary, Robyn presented a Partner School certificate to an eMentoring student from Catholic College Wodonga, as well a Partner School Certificate to the students and staff at Sacred Heart College in Yarrawonga, where Principal Lew Nagle sang the praises of In2science, delineating the opportunities the program provides their students to ignite their passion for STEM, thereby inspiring them to pursue a STEM-based career. A short drive down the highway and Robyn was warmly welcomed by Tiffany Chandler, from one of In2science’s newest partner schools, Notre Dame College in Shepparton. With its combination of passionate teachers, outstanding new science facilities, and the new In2science partnership, it is evident that Notre Dame College students are afforded every opportunity to explore science and the rewarding STEM-based careers that can follow.

Interested in hosting a mentor? Click here!

Reflections on Semester 1, 2018

By | News

Semester 1, 2018 saw 129 In2science mentors from La Trobe University, RMIT University, Swinburne University of Technology and The University of Melbourne continue the proud In2science tradition of inspiring secondary school students to continue studying STEM subjects and aspire to STEM-based careers.

In doing so, In2science mentors volunteered a total of 1169 hours to help 1780 high school students across 39 partner schools.

Consistent with past appraisals, feedback from students, teachers and mentors reflected the overwhelmingly positive impact the program has on all who participate.

He showed us different parts of what part science plays in everyday life. It helped me to understand where science hides even if you don’t know it’s there.” – Yr 8 student, Rowville SC

“Lachlan was amazing with the students. He had an ability to quickly build rapport with students, share life experience, share tertiary knowledge and engage all at the same time. Lachlan helped all students in the class, and helped build curiosity in science.” – Teacher, Templestowe College

The majority of teachers (88%) noticed that certain students engaged more in the lesson when a mentor was present, while the same percentage also agreed that the mentor was a good role model for the students, sharing their passion, experience and knowledge of STEM career pathways. Furthermore, by hosting a mentor, 75% of teachers gained the capacity to undertake additional activities in the classroom, while 78% noted that the mentor contributed specialised subject knowledge and real-life examples. This positive teacher feedback is a testament to the high calibre of the mentors recruited to participate in the program.

“Bastien showed great initiative and was very proactive in assisting students and extending them beyond what I had planned, which was fantastic.” – Teacher, Glenroy SC

Indeed, the benefits of the program extend beyond the positive impacts experienced by students and teachers, as mentors also enjoy opportunities to accrue the ‘soft skills’ that will ensure they stand out in an ever more competitive employment market. Amongst mentors, 98% agreed that their participation in In2science enabled development of skills they will use in the future.

“This was one of the best experiences of my uni degree thus far! Can’t wait to do it again next semester.” – Lily Martin, Swinburne University of Technology student and mentor at Auburn High School

Most importantly, this semester saw the In2science program continue to achieve its aims of increasing student engagement in STEM and building students’ aspirations for STEM-based careers. These outcomes were especially strong for those students who mentors were able to work closely with over the course of the semester.

The In2science mentor experience

By | News

By Annabel Khamly

The mentors at In2science share the common traits of studying in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and having a passion for the scientific world. Other than this,  mentors differ from one another immensely.

Each student has a different motivation for applying for In2science. Often, mentors hope to inspire youth by sharing their love for STEM, or some want to voice their diverse journeys to tertiary education. Many have had volunteering experience before and want to continue, and others are seeking opportunities to give back to the community.

In2science also aims to help the mentors in their professional development, giving them a platform to improve their communication, time-management and interpersonal skills.  This reciprocation of benefits is what makes In2science such a great experience for both mentor and mentee.

Take a look at some of the 2018 mentors’ thoughts in the video above!

In2science intern, Annabel Khamly

Annabel made this video during her internship with In2science, as part of her Bachelor of Science degree at The University of Melbourne. Congratulations Annabel and all the best for your future endeavours!

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!

Meet a Mentor: Lachlan McPhee

By | Profiles

In2science mentor Lachie McPhee

What are you studying, and why do you like it? I am in my second year of uni studying a Bachelor of Biomedical Science at La Trobe University. I like the course because of its flexibility in terms of the subjects I want to learn. My core subjects are a maximum of two biochemistry subjects per semester and then I have free reign. I am doing a human anatomy and physiology major and love every minute of it. The way that all the subjects come together shows how deeply involved every structure of the body is. It really allows me to open up to a broader range of thinking when it comes down to something that can normally be so basic.

Tell us about your In2science placement! At first it was really daunting. I was placed in a biology class but had not done biology since first year. I walked into the first class and they were finishing their topic on plant biology – which was really lucky for me. Then I found out that the next topic was human biology, especially looking at the cardiovascular system. It was almost a real coincidence that this happened because I felt that I could now make a serious impact on the students when it comes to their learning. Every week they touch on a new topic and I am able to guide their thinking about a particular topic.

During the middle and end parts of the program I almost stepped into the teacher’s role in a way that I was able to lead a class discussion, teach them a new topic, or help them with their work if they ever needed it.

Why did you become an In2science mentor? A close friend actually recommended that I give the program a go. He knew I had a busy schedule but said that I would fit directly into the program because he saw how well I can interact with students. At first I was unsure about whether the it would be the right program for me, but I signed up knowing that this would be a great experience and would allow me to help influence the next generation of young thinkers.

What’s the best thing about In2science? Definitely the students. Every week the relationships that I build become stronger and stronger with the students. They look forward to me coming in, and I look forward to seeing them every week. Sometimes we don’t even talk about school – they talk to me about their everyday lives which is the best thing about it. I become less like a teacher, and more like a mentor in that regard.

You force yourself to think in many different ways to explain things to students, and importantly, you learn a lot about yourself.

What message do you hope to pass onto the students in your In2science class? Don’t disregard science, even in the most basic form. The logical thinking and processes of inquiry that are applied in class apply everywhere in life. If there’s only one thing to take out of your classes, it should be the ability to think, to learn and, in some cases, to relearn.

What do you want to do after you finish university and why? I would like to work in the sporting area, particularly with regards to concussion. I would like to go to medical school and learn how to treat and manage patients that suffer from concussions. Another option is working in research as a neurophysiologist with a specialisation in concussion – this way I may even be able to continue teaching but at a tertiary level.

If you could have an hour to chat with any scientist/mathematician, who would it be and why? James Watson and Francis Crick. They were the ones to discover that our DNA is in a double helix and encodes everything that makes us unique. How they did that during their time is incredible.

What advice would you give other students looking to get involved in In2science? Even if you’re not sure about it – do it! You’re not just a mentor for the kids in this role, you challenge yourself to think further. You force yourself to think in many different ways to explain things to students, and importantly, you learn a lot about yourself.

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!

In2science awarded Strategic Partnerships Program funding

By | News

In recognition of its ongoing commitment to supporting science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in Victoria, In2science was recently awarded funding from the Victorian Government. Bestowed by The Department of Education and Training (DET), this funding will ensure that this innovative and award-winning program can continue to place university STEM student volunteers into secondary schools to increase engagement, boost enthusiasm and build STEM career aspirations.

For nearly 14 years, In2science has fostered fruitful partnerships between disadvantaged and low SES schools, or regional students disadvantaged by distance, and its partner universities – La Trobe University, RMIT University, Swinburne University of Technology and The University of Melbourne. In doing so, tens of thousands of students have reaped the rewards of interacting with passionate, engaging and enthusiastic STEM university students.

The funding builds the capacity of In2science to work more effectively with students. The program will also expand its reach to include maths and science classes from year 7 all the way through to year 10 in our partner schools. Students who directly engage with mentors develop confidence in their maths and science abilities. Many also consider pursuing a career in STEM fields after these interactions.

 

STEM Career Speed Networking Event lights the way

By | News

“Our STEM mentors build communication skills, interpersonal skills, problem-solving skills and time management – all very important things for future STEM careers”

– Megan Mundy, In2science Program Director

Enthralled In2science mentors, alumni and their fellow STEM students engaged with STEM industry graduates and professionals at our recent Career Speed Networking workshop to gain inside knowledge and advice about kick-starting their #In2scienceSTEMcareers.

In2science Director, Megan Mundy, commenced proceedings with an acknowledgement of country, followed by a brief overview of the In2science Program and finally, directed a special welcome to our guests and mentors. Alistair Grevis-James, Business Systems Analyst at CSL, then provided some insight into the benefits he reaped as an In2science mentor, and how these helped him attain a rewarding and exciting role in a global biotech company. After some housekeeping announcements, a hush descended as the students and industry professionals apprehensively took their places at their assigned station.

The energy in the room was palpable as our guests imparted their wisdom, stoked some fervent discussions, and further invigorated this passionate group of budding STEM enthusiasts to pursue a rewarding career in the STEM disciplines.

The students were very engaged; there were some great questions” – Kathryn Sobey, Head of Science, Auburn High School

In2science mentor, Yubeih He, from the University of Melbourne was equally impressed with our esteemed panel of professionals, “I met with some fantastic people from industry and received great advice”. Similarly, Anish Ramkhelawon from the University of Melbourne observed, “I really appreciated the practical advice and now feel more relaxed about the interview process”.

The small group chats facilitated maximum exposure to a diverse range of STEM professionals and graduates in a relaxed and informal setting. Many took the opportunity to pursue further discussions after the formal proceedings while they enjoyed some refreshments.

Some students and In2science mentors also availed themselves of the opportunity to have their resumes appraised by David Azzopardi (Senior Manager of Talent Development at CSL Behring), Waheed Rashid (Program Manager at Ericsson AU) and Vanessa Ashokkumar (Customer Project Manager, Ericsson); the In2science Team sincerely thank them for providing this valuable service.

With new contacts made and enthusiasm ignited, the event was reluctantly drawn to a close.

In2science gratefully acknowledges the Selby Scientific Foundation, whose generous support enabled us to run this event. In2science also extends our heartfelt thanks to all who participated, and particularly our inspirational guests:

  • Rachel Johnston – Technical Director, BP
  • Eliza Tipping Smith – Operations Analyst, BP
  • Sally Lowenstein – Science Communicator, Bureau of Meteorology
  • Kathryn Sobey – Head of Science, Auburn High School
  • Sarah Longhurst – Consultant, Deloitte
  • David Azzopardi – Senior Manager of Talent Development, CSL Behring
  • Alistair Grevis-James – Business Systems Analyst, CSL
  • Tiarne Ecker – Biodiversity Science Graduate, Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research
  • Jaydene Pearson – Graduate Engineer, Lendlease
  • Waheed Rashid – Program Director, Ericsson Australia
  • Vanessa Ashokkummar – Customer Project Manager, Ericsson Australia

Meet a Mentor: Alicia Stevens

By | Profiles

In2science mentor Ali Stevens

What are you studying, and why do you like it? I am currently in my third year of a Bachelor of Health Science at Swinburne University of Technology, majoring in psychology and psychophysiology. I love psychology as it has taught me the skills to be able to help and understand others. I find psychophysiology so fascinating as the brain is such a complex system and its capacities continue to astound me!

Tell us about your In2science placement! I am currently mentoring at St. Joseph’s College Ferntree Gully. I was a bit apprehensive at the start as it’s an all-boys year 8 science class, but I liked the idea of a challenge! The boys can be very energetic at times, but it’s really fun to take that energy and get them engaged in what they are learning and relate it to things that they haven’t thought of before!

Why did you become an In2science mentor? I struggled with science at school and never thought I was capable of studying it at university so avoided it altogether during VCE. I really wish I could have had someone tell me back then that I was more than capable and that you shouldn’t let others limit your potential. I want to be that voice of encouragement for students: If I can do science, anyone can!

What’s the best thing about In2science? I had a student who was quite shy, in the sense that he enjoyed science but kept it quiet because all his friends thought it was uncool. He told me that he wanted to have a career in sport instead, as that’s what all his friends wanted to do. I was able to have a lovely chat with him telling him about careers in sport science and sport psychology, both disciplines he had never heard of before. It was lovely to see him become so excited about science and the possibility of what studying STEM could do for him.

I really wish I could have had someone tell me back then that I was more than capable… I want to be that voice of encouragement for students.

What message do you hope to pass onto the students in your In2science class? Don’t give up on something because you don’t find it easy to start with! If you find the subject matter interesting keep at it and it will become easier with time.

What inspired you to study what you are currently studying? I grew up in England and I know it’s going to sound silly, but I saw a stage show performed by Derren Brown who does tricks based on psychology and I found it amazing! After that, I read as many books about the mind as I could and just knew that’s what I wanted to do with my career.

What do you want to do after you finish university and why? I haven’t fully decided yet, but I know that after my undergraduate degree I want to continue my studies! I love educational psychology, so I want to do either a masters degree or a PhD in that field. I really want to help children to have the best experience and support during their school years as it can be such a tough and challenging time for them.

If you could have an hour to chat with any scientist/mathematician, who would it be and why? Erik Erikson! He was a developmental psychologist who studied humans at all stages of their life. I would love to have been able to chat with him about his findings and how they changed the way we view lifespan development today.

What advice would you give other students looking to get involved in In2science? Definitely do it! Yes, it can be challenging, but it is so rewarding. Being able to give students a more personal perspective on studying STEM is invaluable knowledge to pass on. I’ve talked to students who say they don’t like science; yet when they have an open discussion about science with someone who can give them one-on-one attention, they’ve realised that science isn’t limited to what we learn at school, it can take you in any direction in life you wish to go!

Want to become an In2science mentor? Click here!